Signature Living

Travel to Liverpool

Travel to Liverpool and see what our amazing City has to offer

Travel to Liverpool and experience one of the best cities that the U.K. has to offer, we have it all, amazing sites, stunning buildings not to mention our shopping centres, football and nightlife.

By plane

Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL) (ICAO: EGGP), [3]. Around 160 flights arrive daily from within the UK and Europe. The airport is well-served by low-cost airlines including Easyjet and Ryanair. For a complete listing of airlines and destinations, see the Summer [4] and Winter [5] timetables.
The airport offers a Fast Track service, which for a charge, means you can bypass the queue at security, but this tends to be worthwhile only for first flights of the day or if you risk missing your flight.
Liverpool John Lennon Airport is about 12km to the south of the city centre. Immediately outside the arrivals area you will find a taxi rank and bus stops. Taxis to the city centre cost around £12 (Approx. €16, US$24) for the 20 minute journey.
Several bus routes go directly to the city centre from the airport:

The No. 500 Airport Express runs every 30 minutes and takes about 45 minutes to reach the city centre. Cost is £2.60/€4 Adults, £1/€2 Children and £5/€10 Families. Student discount: £1.40. It should be said that it is as quick to use the service buses (listed below) and it is significantly cheaper.
The following local buses cost £1.60 to get into the city centre (£1.40 for students). As discussed above, they’re as quick and cheaper to use:
The No. 80A, run by Arriva, runs every 15 minutes and takes 45 minutes to the city centre.
The No. 82A, also run by Arriva, runs every 30 minutes and takes around 40 minutes to the city centre. This runs direct to Paradise Street interchange without stopping elsewhere in the city centre.
The No. 86A (Arriva) runs every 15 minutes during the day and now runs through the night, every half hour. This takes a little less time than the 80A as it is a more direct route down Smithdown Road. Journey time is 40 minutes but may be longer at peak traffic times.
The No. 81A also serves the airport, but does not go into the city centre. It may prove useful if you want to visit Woolton or the north of the city, as the route goes round the city ring road, Queens Drive, and terminates in Bootle.
The 80A and 86A also stop at Liverpool South Parkway station. It’s a 10 minutes journey from where a frequent train service runs to the city centre in about 15 minutes. This may be a better option at times of peak road traffic (8AM-9AM, 5PM-6PM).
Manchester Airport (IATA: MAN) (ICAO: EGCC) can also be used and may be a better option. It is about a 45-60 minute drive away from Liverpool. Direct train services also run between Liverpool Lime Street Station and Manchester Airport operated by Northern Rail. Manchester Airport serves a variety of long haul destinations in North America and Asia, as well as short haul services throughout Europe.

By train

Liverpool Central is served by Liverpool Lime Street station which is in the heart of the city centre. Trains arrive frequently from all parts of the U.K.
Liverpool is only about two hours from London by train. There’s a train about every hour, with extra weekday evening peak services from London, and it’s not too expensive to get there. You can get a saver ticket for £60 on the day of travel, or for as little as £8.00 if you book a couple of weeks in advance. Tickets are released three months in advance.
There is a direct train from Manchester Airport to Liverpool every hour at peak times (around 6:30AM-7:30PM). In addition, it is possible to reach Liverpool by changing at Manchester Piccadilly or Manchester Oxford Road.
Other main services
Birmingham, 1 hr 30 – 1h 45 minutes, half hourly Manchester, 50 minutes – 1h 10 minutes, 5 trains an hour (3 fast to Piccadilly and Oxford Road, of which 1 via Earlestown and 2 via Warrington, 1 slow to Oxford Road (extra services in peak times) and 1 slow to Victoria) Leeds, 2 hours, hourly Sheffield and Nottingham, 1h 30 mins and 3 hours respectively, hourly

By bus

National Express [7], the U.K.’s largest scheduled coach company has a bus station on Norton Street, a short walk from Liverpool City Centre. London is four to five hours away by coach and is served by a half a dozen services per day. Manchester is served by an hourly service taking a similar time to the train (except at rush hour). Manchester Airport can be reached by coach in under one hour, six coaches run per day.
Megabus [8] operates a fleet of ex-Hong Kong buses on its network across the U.K. There is one bus daily from London to Liverpool. Journey time 4-5 hours. Prices range from £1 (€1.46) to £11 (€16) depending on how far in advance you book.
Over the next 10 years a Park and Ride scheme will be developed, with easy access to the city centre, for more information see National Park and Ride Directory [9].
Liverpool One Executive Travel [10] Provides an executive 16 seat minibus service from all airports, seaports and other locations. Prices vary depending on distances. Call 07761042952 or visit the website for further information.

Liverpool City Centre is small enough to walk around, but black cabs are plentiful if you are feeling lazy. Buses run out from the centre regularly from Paradise Street Interchange (mainly to the south) and Queen Square (mainly north/east). Both bus stations have travel centres with sometimes helpful staff who will assist with which bus to get and from which stand. At these, Saveaway, Solo and Trio travel passes can be purchased. The Saveaway presents a good value for the visitor, at £3.30 for unlimited travel for one day in ‘Area C’ (includes city centre, west out to Huyton, north to Crosby and south to Speke), including trains. All-zone Saveaways can be obtained for about a pound more and will take you through the whole of the Merseytravel area. Perfect for visiting the Wirral and as far as Chester or Southport, these include train and ferry services as well as buses. Trio (train, bus and ferry) and Solo (bus only) tickets require a photo, but have no peak-time limitations and can be bought for a week, month or year. This is ideal for visitors staying longer or working and therefore requiring more flexible travel. A Trio for one week costs about £14.70 for one zone, a Solo about the same for one area.
The train service in Liverpool is quite reliable and efficient these days (having once been nicknamed ‘Miseryrail’ and ‘MerseyFail’ by commuters). The main stations in the city centre are Central, Lime Street, Moorfields and James Street. Lime Street is the terminus for many national lines and the local city line to Manchester. Moorfields is just off Dale Street, ideal for the business centre of Liverpool and Central is usually used by shoppers and visitors. Local trains run very frequently between Hunts Cross, Kirkby, Ormskirk and Southport on the Northern line. They run every 15 minutes from Monday to Saturday and 30 minutes on Sunday. Central station is the main station for the Northern line, although the ‘loop’ links the three main city centre stations. The Wirral line forms the link between the Lime Street, Moorfields and Central, so all of these stations act as an interchange between the City, Northern and Wirral lines.
A new station in the south of Liverpool replaced the old Garston and Allerton stations in June 2006. This links the Northern and City lines and is ideal for the airport. It also acts as an interchange for a number of local buses. Adult bus fares on the main operator Arriva are a flat £1.60, or £1.40 for students, throughout the Merseyside area. Similar flat fares are available from the other operators as well. There are also limited night bus services on a Saturday night costing £3.00. Some buses are subsidised by Merseytravel, such as early morning and hospital services, and there is a maximum fare of around 80p. If you plan to travel a lot, a prepaid pass presents much better value. Generally speaking, you save money with two or more train trips or three or more bus journeys.
[edit][add listing]See

Old (St. Nicholas and Our Lady Church) and new architecture
A great thing about Liverpool is the architecture. For so long it was neglected and run down, but these days most of the city centre is quite splendid.
Royal Liver Building, (on the riverside). Iconic symbol of Liverpool waterfront – this 1911 skyscraper still dominates the distinctive Liverpool skyline . This is the home of the legendary Liver Birds that sit atop the building looking out across to the Wirral. The river-facing face of the clock is six feet larger in diameter than that of the clock tower at Westminster. edit
St. George’s Hall, Lime Street (near railway station). A mammoth of a Greco-Roman-style building which was built by wealthy merchants for the people of the city. It is arguably the finest neo-classical building in Western Europe, and has recently been thoroughly restored for Capital of Culture Year. Inside it has one of the best church organs in Europe. On the outside it has a selection of classical murals which were thought quite shocking in their day (due to the shameful female nudity). Free.. edit
World Museum Liverpool, (near St. George’s Hall), [11]. This is a fine building and well worth a visit. It contains an excellent collection of British rocketry exhibits, as well as the best Egyptological collection outside London. Free.. edit
Liverpool Central Library, (near St. George’s Hall). This is another fine building, boasting a beautiful circular reading room. Free.. edit
Walker Art Gallery, (near St George’s Hall), ☎ 8798724, [12]. Daily 10AM-5PM. Currently displaying Ben Johnson’s Liverpool Cityscape 2008 and the World Panorama Series. Free. edit
The Bluecoat, (School Lane), ☎ 7025324 (info@thebluecoat.org.uk), [13]. Daily 10AM-6PM. The Bluecoat is the oldest Grade 1 listed building in Liverpool’s city centre (dating back to 1717). Following a £14.5m redevelopment, it re-opened in March 2008, as a major landmark on the UK map of contemporary culture. With a new wing of galleries and a state-of-the-art Performance Space, the Bluecoat showcases talent across all creative disciplines including visual art, music, literature, dance and live art, and nurtures new talent by providing studio spaces for artists within a unique creative community. Free. edit
St. Nicholas and Our Lady Church, (just off the riverside). This is the city’s parish church and home to the third Liver Bird (there are in fact three of them, not two). edit
Albert Dock, (on the riverside), [14]. This is one of the more sophisticated places in Liverpool and is situated in the largest collection of Grade I listed buildings in the UK. Old warehouses have been converted into shops, apartments, restaurants, pubs, hotels, galleries and museums. For fan of the old This Morning show with Richard and Judy, this is also where the 3D island weather map was situated in the centre of the dock on the water. Free.. edit
Merseyside Maritime Museum, Albert Dock, [15]. Dedicated to the maritime history of the city, complete with galleries on customs and excise and emigration to the New World. There are also a number of vessels to see, such as the Mersey river tug Brocklebank and the river cargo carrier Wyncham. Free.. edit
International Slavery Museum, Albert Dock, Liverpool (Within the Merseyside Maritime Museum), ☎ 0151 478 4499, [16]. 10AM-5PM. “Our aim is to address ignorance and misunderstanding by looking at the deep and permanent impact of slavery and the slave trade on Africa, South America, the USA, the Caribbean and Western Europe. Thus we will increase our understanding of the world around us.” ~Dr David Fleming OBE, director, National Museums Liverpool Free. edit
Tate Liverpool, Albert Dock, [17]. A fine modern art gallery. A definite visit for arty folk. The Turner Art Prize was hosted here from Oct. 19, 2007 to Jan. 13, 2008. This was the first time the award was held outside of London. Free (charge for some exhibitions).. edit
The Beatles Story, Albert Dock, [18]. The Beatles originated in Liverpool. The Beatles Story is the only museum in the world that is entirely Beatles-themed, with exhibitions such as their instruments and other artifacts. Other attractions based on The Beatles include their homes, Penny Lane, commemorative statues, Strawberry Fields, and more. £12.25 (adult). edit
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, [19]. Catholic. Affectionately known by the locals as Paddy’s Wigwam or “the Pope’s launching pad”. Visit on a sunny day as the stained glass ceiling looks fantastic! Free.. edit
Liverpool Cathedral, [20]. It may not look like a wigwam, but is so imposing that the architect of Lord Derby’s tomb claimed that no self-respecting church mouse would live there. As a result, he incorporated a mouse into the design of the tomb – it’s just under Lord Derby’s pillow. Liverpool Cathedral is one of the finest examples in the world of Gothic revival architecture. On a clear day, the tower affords breathtaking views over Liverpool, Merseyside and beyond. Free.. edit
Princes Road Synagogue (Liverpool Old Hebrew Congregation), [21]. This is an impressive combination of Gothic and Moorish architecture by the Audsley brothers. The colourful interior has to be seen to be believed. Tours can be arranged through their web site. edit
Liverpool Town Hall. . Built in 1754, the Official Residence of Liverpool’s Lord Mayor is an elegant stone building, having two fronts; one towards Castle Street, the other towards the area formed by the New Exchange Buildings. Each front consists of an elegant range of Corinthian columns, supporting a pediment, and are themselves supported by a rustic base. Between the capitals are heads, and emblems of commerce in basso-relievo; and on the pediment of the grand front is a noble piece of sculpture representing Commerce committing her treasures to the race of Neptune. edit
Victoria Gallery & Museum, (near the Catholic Cathedral), [22]. Tue-Sat 10AM-5PM. The University of Liverpool’s museum comprising their art collection and artefacts housed in an amazing Gothic building which coined the term ‘red brick university’. edit
Williamson’s Tunnels, [23]. Heritage Centre T-Su. In the early 1800s, a Liverpool tobacco merchant, Joseph Williamson, funded the construction of an enormous labyrinth of tunnels under the Edge Hill area of Liverpool. To this day, nobody knows his reasons for doing so though many guess it as an act of philanthropy, using his wealth to provide jobs and training for thousands of Liverpool workers. There is also a Williamson’s Tunnels Heritage Centre. edit
Speke Hall, (near John Lennon Airport), [24]. This is a half-timbered Tudor house set on large grounds. It has parts dating back to the 1530s. edit
Croxteth Hall and Country Park, [25]. edit This is one of Liverpool’s most important heritage sites, one of “the finest working country estates in the North West” and was the winner of the European Capital of Culture 2008. The park is at the heart of what was once a great country estate stretching hundreds of square miles and was the ancestral home of the Molyneux family, the Earls of Sefton. After the death of the last Earl it was given to the City of Liverpool. The estate has four main attractions – The Historic Hall, Croxteth Home Farm, the Victorian Walled Garden and a 500 acre country park including the new Croxteth Local Nature Reserve. A new addition to what’s on offer at Croxteth is the West Derby Courthouse. Dating from the reign of Elizabeth I, this is one of the oldest public buildings in Liverpool.
Sudley House, Mossley Hill Road, Aigburth. Free.. edit An art gallery which contains the collection of George Holt in its original setting. It includes work by Thomas Gainsborough, Joshua Reynolds, Edwin Landseer and J. M. W. Turner.
Fab4D Cinema, Pier Head, [26]. The Beatles Story’s Fab4D experience is an innovative and exciting experience for all the family. edit
Canada Boulevard, The Pierhead. Runs the entire length of the Three Graces frontage and consists of a boulevard of maple trees with plaques laid into the pavement listing the Canadian ships lost during the Second World war. edit
Pier Head, [27]. Harbour of Liverpool has played a very important role in modern history of the city. The wharf area drained by the Mersey River gives to the city an air of antiquity, which is quite strange and interesting because of the contrast between modern buildings and conventional buildings. The Pier Head has been considered as world heritage by UNESCO. edit
Static Gallery, 23 Roscoe Lane, L1 9JD, ☎ +44 1517078090. edit
Wolstenholme Creative Space, 11 Wolstenholme Square, L14JJ (between Duke Street, Slater Street, Hannover Street & Seel Street. Look for the balls.), [28]. Wolstenholme is an artist run gallery and studio space situated within a beautiful listed ex textile factory in the heart of Liverpool city centre. Info can be found on the blog, via email (wolstenholmecreativespace@gmail.com) of just by dropping by, you may be fortunate enough to stumble upon some impromptu happening. edit
[edit]Comedy
Comedy nights are featured on Friday and Saturday at Baby Blue, a nice club on the exclusive Albert Dock, which is known as a celebrity hotspot. Check online [29] for more info and tickets.
Also for laughs, try Rawhide at the Royal Court Theater which showcases some of the best in regional and national comedy talent.
Every June or July there is a fortnight long *Liverpool Comedy Festival which takes place in venues across the city. One event not to be missed is the now legendary Drink up Stand up pub crawls which includes four pubs, four comedians, one compere (host) and a megaphone!
On the first Tuesday of the month the Fab Café on Hope Street hosts a comedy night with two or three local comics plus a compere.
Express Comedy, [30]. Based in Birkenhead across the river Mersey, Express Comedy has a stand-up comedy night called Laughter at the Lauries.
[edit] Guided Tours
For those in a hurry there are a number of operators offering guided tours, either using their own transportation or offering their services as “hop-on, hop-off Guides” on your coach or offering guided walks. The best way of getting an overview of the city, is by taking the City Explorer open-top bus [31] run by Maghull Coaches. With 12 stops you can hop on and off all day. Qualified local guides provide the commentary and can answer your questions about the city. For Beatles fans, there is the Magical Mystery Tour [32] which will take you around the places associated with the Beatles both in the city centre and in the suburbs. For a more tailored tour, there’s Liverpool Entente Cordiale Tours [33]. Their Liverpool tour guides can plan a walk for you or hop on your coach and guide you around the city. They offer tours in English or French. They can also locate guides Spanish, German, Chinese and Russian if necessary.
[edit][add listing]Do

 

About lawrence1601

Lawrence Kenwright is the proprietor of Signature Living and 30 James Street, a husband and father with a passion for restoring old historic Liverpool buildings.

booking_popout_katie
Book Your Stay